Police Station/Toll | Checkpoint

Bolivia

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Last Visited: 11 months ago
GPS: -18.162270, -63.506090
Altitude: 654.0 masl

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alexm_

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Nice police officers turned out to be really corrupt. We were two cars and passed other police stations without any issue and with a smile. Here we had to pay 50Bs without any receipt for some paper which they printed on their own and nobody needs. While we were here locals arrived and also paid 2 Bolivianos each for a stamp. The money disappeared in a hidden hole in the table.

This action really ruined our day, and we thought about writing some letter to the police station in Santa Cruz. I would advice everybody if possible not to pay or at least complain about this.

After that we talked long to a local businessman and he told us that this is well known to the government and that it was in the press already. They replaced the policemen but the new ones just continue asking for money from everybody probably also protected by the government. He strongly advised us not to argue with the police because otherwise they will check for your first aid kit, your fire extinguisher, all your papers or any other thing they find or make up. He said welcome to Bolivia and do not wonder why there are so many "Evo No" signs everywhere....

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Went through no problems. O
People in the hut seemed to be getting these pointless stamps and possibly paying a "fee" for them. I had my go pro monte on my chest especially for the occasion though and after asking why he wanted to give me a stamp he just hurried me out.

Serious and unfriendly cop. Asked for driver's license and the TIP for the vehicle. Looked around our van but nothing seemed to interest him so he let us go without any problems.

Police officer asked for coca leafs, since we did not have he asked silent (gestic) for money. Paid 20 bs.

yes corrupt. i had bad luck, I had to use my fire extinguisher one day ago, didn't bought a new one and then got asked for the first time ever for it...after that they searched for everything and wanted 2000bs for the missing /half empty extinguisher . I ended up waiting in there police house and smoked one cigarette after the other, they didn't liked it and send me away.

checked our triangle, fire exctinctor and first aid kit... then tried to say that we needed a special form to go until Brasil...
We knew this thing and that it is a way to make you pay for something you don't need.
We said that we knew that the only paper we need is the paper of the customs (and our ID and driving licence of course) and after a discussion let us go...

Check of driver‘s license and TIP. Easy going.

Today we were not stopped. We showed our toll receipt at the toll booth then the man dropped the rope for us and we drove straight through.

Same as before we took a detour around the check point through town and popped back up to the road between the check point and the toll booth. Toll was closed. Looking back we could see the rope across the road they were definitely stopping all vehicles. Not that I mind paying for a toll at all, just that I prefer to spend my money on delicious brandy instead of bribes!! Not sure if we got lucky again but hey, you got to try these things! Totally ninja!

no problem with the police at all, passed through here 3 times. quick check of the car paper and our passports. we are in a new chilean landcruiser which may have made it easier not looking like scruffy travellers, not saying others on here are but we have seen some who just look like messy victims. keep it smart and friendly and no problem. we live in Cambodia so know how this sort of thing goes down. if you do have a issue just pay and put it down as an anecdote about your trip. safe travelling!

They let everyone one pass without even moving until we arrived they pulled the cord and stop us straight away. Ask for all safety pack and even check the date on the disinfectant, they try by any way to find something. At the end they had nothing so they give the papers back and ask of a "collaboration", we say no and left.

First corrupt policemen in South America in 11 months. Asked us to open the car and found our 20 L jerrycan (full with fuel). Said that's not allowed and confiscated it. Had a long talk in their office and had to pay 50 bolivianos to get it back.

Same thing with the jerrycan. Called my lawyer friend from La Paz and after talking to her they apologized and we could keep the jerrycan. Tried to show me some laws that say it is prohibited to take combustibles on public transport. Very arrogant and dumb police officers I personally hope one day they get blown away when the new Che arrives :)

They stopped us here and checked our documents. They asked for 100 Bolivianos we always said that we don't understand. After some time we just had to pay 1 Bolivianos. They locals go in with their Recipe from the Tollstation and 1 ore 2 Bolivianos and leave. So stay kind and don't speak Spanish ;-)

Todo tranquilo,no tuvimos ningum problema,apresentamos nuestra licencia y declaracion jurada,hablamos todo en português y no paso nada,quedamos 5 minutos y de pronto avanzamos.

Passed through here about 1pm. Hot day. Checked driving licence and toll ticket. Asked if we had combustible in the van. We said no - thankfully he was too lazy to check. ;-)

a old man lifted the barrier when we arrived and he told US to go to the office police. there, a big policeman in his chair asked where we were going ? then he asked a contribution ... we have shown the ticket toll and we say that we have already paid for the toll. he insisted 3 times and we replied 3 times the same thing then left US go.

un petit homme vieux a levé la barrière quand nous sommes arrivé et il nous a dit d’aller à l’office de police. là un gros policier dans sa chaise a demandé où nous allions puis il a demandé une contribution... nous avons montré le ticket de péage et nous avons dis que nous avons déjà payé pour le péage. il a insisté 3 fois et nous avons répondu 3 fois la même chose puis il nous a laissé partir.

People, do yourself and everybody else a favor and STOP PAYING BRIBES!!!
Of course, if you dont have a First Aid Kit, Triangle, Fire extinguisher etc., get them. But you should have them anyway because it is mainly for your safety! In the end probably cheaper than the bribes...

They tried the same with the jerrycans with us. Told them we bought the Diesel in Bolivia and they wanted to see the receipt. We told them that we threw it away.
They were searching all around the car. Take your time, be relaxed. In the end we needed to go inside the small office. He wanted to charge us and said that foreigners are not allowed to carry Diesel in jerrycans. I laughed and he started to get angry and loud. I asked him to show me the law, he showed me some texts. I asked where exactly, he said as a Tourist I need to know the law and so on...
In the end he screamed at me. Dont worry, there is really NOTHING he can do if you have all your stuff together. Just take your time, they will get bored at some point. In the end he let us go without paying anything...

The problem still exists. After checking triangles, extinguishers, first aid kits etc they finally noticed diesel in jerrycans and wanted an invoice.
We found one but with notice about filling the tank directly and they didn't accept it. Finally paid the bribe 100BOB.
p.s. Pretending we don't speak spanish failed as well. They used google translator :-)

Hello
They just look my passport and ask what we are doing in Bolivia.
He open a drawer in the desk and with a smile he said you have to pay here.
I said that there is the toll just after abd he said it's a different toll.
I explaun to the 3 policemen here that I'm work for my governement and I proud of this, and that if he ask money he give a bad idea of him, of his profession and his country.
They look at me and make a embarrassed smile and say OK you can go...
Yessssss

Officer looked at the drivers license and asked if everything was okay...simple. We were prepared for the worst, but pleasantly surprised with an easy stop (less than 2 minutes).

We passed this station during daytime and nothing happened. No control, not even a police officer, only the toll station. We were scared before driving from Samaipata to Santa Cruz and asked in a building from the government at main suqare Samaipata what we can do. They said its no problem because during the day they dont check you - just at nighttime.

Got in the trap of this people driving towards Santa Cruz. Argentinian number plate, was told I were caught speeding and had to pay 400Bs in Banco Union and the car would get confiscated. Then they checked everything in the car and found nothing. Told me he can help me to get away if I help him, so I spent 50Bs in a fast getaway because it was getting late and dark. Went to a Police Station two days later, got the number of a friendly officer with many stripes on his uniform and will call him if I have troubles with police again. Police stop in Angostura made me feel very unconfortable, despite of knowing beforehands what is going to happen.

Passed today on a motorbike. But they just checked the TIP and the Transito document, stamped them and let me go. It was a shame as I had prepared to play rough LOL. It was quite busy with locals today, so maybe thats why they let me go without too much hassle...

They checked our first aid kit, tip and orden de traslado, we could show them all what they asked for. But still they wanted to pay us 50 bol for some kind of another paper. After argueing and after we explained them that the police at the aduana told us we wouldn't have to pay anything else if we show the orden de translado, they finally let us pass without paying.

Took the dirt road but they saw us.. we have no idea how..
they followed us with a motorcycle and we had to come back with us.
We said we took the dirt road because the kids wanted to pee.
They checked my passport and the car papers..
they said we made an infraction because we took the dirt road and didn’t pay the toll.
So we showed our toll from Santa cruz..
they let us go.. we had to pass at the toll again. They stamped our toll.. we didn’t pay anything at the toll nor at the police station.

They were very unfriendly. Be careful and don’t take the dirt road.. they know people do this..

took the dirt road that is in the corner to the right of the police station in town, fine for 2wd in dry.

Definitely take the detour to avoid this checkpoint! We decided to give it a go and had a completely different experience to the ones below. They took photos of our license plate, and bidones and then told us to come to the office where they demanded receipts for gasoline. We told them we didn't have any and we'd bought the gasoline in Argentina and it was only for emergencies.. Amazingly we were able to find some old receipts in the car but they weren't too happy about that either - they then tried telling us that it was illegal to bring fuel from other countries, but we told them the Aduana said it was ok and we pointed out our previous checkpoint stamps. After 20 minutes of arguing, us filming them, them filming us, us pretending not to understand them, and threatening to call our embassy, they gave up and begrudgingly gave us the stamp on the back of our TIP and let us go. Strangely enough they didn't ask us for/demand any money. It seems like they've changed their game plan and are now focusing on foreigners buying fuel.. Quite an entertaining experience but avoid it if you're not up to the challenge!

Bypassed via the dirt road just south of the highway, visible on open street maps (but not google maps) as mentioned previously.

just drove across the chain right behind a truck. nobody stopped me or yelled at me.

I don't know if I would describe them as corrupt so much as they are just VERY thorough. The bribe for 50 Bol other overlanders were talking about may have just been the Orden de Traslado, something you need to drive around in Bolivia anyways. Get one at the police station (for 50 Bol) to get through these checkpoints more smoothly. They also asked to see our botiquin (first aid kit), fire extinguisher, reflective triangles and high vis vests. Since we had everything they let us go with a smile.

Nobody there when we passed! Maybe siesta time (13.00) ;)

We passt this place with 2 cars.first one could drive without stopping.the stoppt the second one, the showed the orden de translado and a copy of the driverlicens and could drive without paying

We didn't get a chance to pay the 2bol since they immediatly pulled us aside in a very unfriendly way and asked for documents. After a lot of hassle they finally gave back our papers and told us to pay 50bol (for no reason) but since we got our papers back we decided to take our chances and just drive off slowly, nobody followed us. We acted like we didn't speak a word of Spanish the entire time.

We passed by when it was getting dark, and no one bothered us, and we didn't pay anything. We haven't paid a bribe in any of the 17 countries in 15 months. Not for crossing the death road for example or anything single other thing. Sometimes we just give money or other things to the really less fortunate people out there that we would not like to trade places with. I've been kind of almost put in jail a few times, and had some amazingly interesting and long conversations with authority figures, but eventually we keep on rolling

30bolivianos for the Orden de Translado. We didn't have it so they issued it there, everyone else was paying 2bs.

Yep, they tried to sell us some funny paper. We just acted as if we did not understand even when the police man told us he was thirsty... Did not have to pay anything but had to show all our papers since they thought we were Chilenan like our car!

its Bolivia. dont waste your time trying to inventing the wheel. You should pay a litle tip . about 0.30 usd is enough. ( 2bol) and move on.

No problems here, stopped at the rope, went into the Police booth and got the peaje slip stamped told them which car was ours and kept moving. (Heading Santa Cruz to Sucre)

The barrier was closed so we had to stop. Just went into the police station like all the others. Showed the papers, get a stamp and payed 2BOL like the locals.

Showing papers, No problem

We only had to show our peaje paper and driving license. Nothing to pay, no problems, no other checks, 2 minutes and we could drive on.

We got charged 50bol here for a meaningless piece of paper too. Held us for about 15 minutes and would not budge. Locals were also dropping coins to the guy to go through but not sure how much, very unpleasant man!

Driving towards Samaipata we had to have our TIP stamped and a policeman wanted to see our fire extinguisher, but no money was asked for and we didn't see other people pay anything.

After the peaje a man (no police man) told us to park and go to this police station to control our documents. We just refused friendly and asked why all the other cars can pass by. He reflected for a second and told us finally to drive on. So just stand your ground, friendly, and maybe you're lucky as well...

not sure if it was required but because of this warning we took a dirt road shown on maps.me that took us around this checkpoint.

Nice police officers turned out to be really corrupt. We were two cars and passed other police stations without any issue and with a smile. Here we had to pay 50Bs without any reciept for some bullshit paper which they printed on their own and nobody needs. While we were here locals arrived and also paid 2 Bolivianos each for a stamp. The money disappeared in a hidden hole in the table.
This action really ruined our day, and we thought about writing some letter to the police station in Santa Cruz. I would advice everybody if possible not to pay or at least complain about this assholes and call for some discount because of this entry....

After that we talked long to a local businessman and he told us that this is well known to the government and that it was in the press allready. They replaced the policemen but the new ones just continue asking for money from everybody probably also protected by the government. He strongly advised us not to argue with the police because otherwise they will check for your first aid kit, your fire distingischer, all your papers or any other bullshit they find or make up...He said welcome to Bolivia and do not wonder why there are so many "Evo No" signs everywhere....